The Improbability of Love by Hannah Rothschild

The Improbability of Love by Hannah Mary Rothschild
The Improbability of Love
by Hannah Mary Rothschild

Patricia Gilmer‘s review

Sep 29, 2016  ·  edit
really liked it

bookshelves: library-book

Read from September 23 to 29, 2016

 

A many layered tale about a painting that a young chef, Annie, buys on a whim from a junk shop in London. Though she is working for two art dealers, she has no real interest in art, but is soon persuaded to try and find out the origins of the painting.
Meanwhile, a powerful art dealer, who built his family business as a German Jew who survived WWII, begins to desperately seek for a painting he had given a lover who unexpectedly died. Though his daughter doesn’t understand why this painting is so important to her father, she begins to search for the painting and begins to uncover the history of the painting, as well as that of her father.
Suspense, a bit of romance, an array of interesting characters, and the history of an 18th century French artist all add up to make an entertaining tale.
Advertisements

Declare to (the) Next Generation

 

20160912_101003

Well, I said a few weeks back that I would take some time to explain the name of my blog. When I started my blog, I had in mind writing about homeschooling and sharing news in education (mostly in reading and writing). I wanted to share and review any books that I consider worthwhile, as well as give information on any events going on that other homeschoolers might find helpful. (I’ll go ahead and say, I don’t post reviews on books I didn’t like or can’t recommend. I may blast a book privately, but knowing the struggles of writing, I have no interest in being public about one that maybe just wasn’t my cup of tea; though I just returned one to the library that might make me change my stance on that). Being a mother, a teacher, and a mentor–sharing with the next generation is always very much on my mind, so hence the title. The idea to “declare to the next generation” is hardly an original thought. (Do I actually have those? Sorry; that would be another blog). There are several verses in the Bible that instruct us to declare or say to the next generation what we have learned concerning Him and His Name.

Psalm 78:4–We will not hide them from their children but tell to the coming generation, the glorious deeds of the LORD, and His might and the wonders that He has done.

Psalm 145:4–One generation shall commend your works to another, and shall declare your mighty acts. In the Amplified Version: One generation shall praise Your works to another, And shall declare Your mighty and remarkable acts.

20160912_101047

All of these verses express a desire and an expectation. We are expected to declare, to commend and to praise–not to hide–His works; especially to another generation. And that is what I want to do with my reading, my writing, my life. Since I decided to recharge my blog (focusing more on reading and writing and less on education), I thought of changing the name, but what could be more important than declaring His works to the next generation? Whether reading, writing, or educating, it is only because of Him that I can do any of these things.  “If we grant that as artists, our ways of creating and seeing begin with the creativity of God, then let’s look at the root of that imaginative impulse.” (Luci Shaw)

Though I am writing and sharing with my peers, as well as older generations (yes, there are still one or two of those still alive), my ultimate goal would be to pass on my learning and experiences to the next generation. What we learn is worthless if it is not passed on to others. It is also this thought that has inspired me to begin the book I am writing. But, more on that at another time.

The Forest for the Trees: An Editor’s Advice to Writers–Betsy Lerner

forest for the trees

Writers, Agents, and Editors! Oh, my! Different animals that work together to bring forth stories, articles, and books.  As a writer, I know I need to understand what agents are looking for (as well as publishers) and how exactly editors can be helpful to my writing. It is easy when you are struggling to be noticed and published to see these animals as the enemy that must be overcome and appeased, but it is much better to look at them as those who are working in the same game that you are, and who are wanting to help you achieve excellence in writing.

In the July/August edition of Poets & Writers, I read an article by Betsy Lerner in which she discusses being a writer, an editor, and an agent (all titles she has held and can proudly claim). She discusses the three different occupations–their differences and yet how they work together.

Enjoying the article, I found her book, The Forest for the Trees at the library and brought it home. The chapter titles themselves were intriguing: “The Ambivalent Writer”, “The Self-Promoter”, and “The Neurotic”; to name a few.

Working as an editor for many years, Lerner has a great understanding of writers and their many neuroses and phobias. I found myself laughing at something in every chapter; and though she is probably using humor deliberately, I’m afraid she is also very serious.

Among my favorite quotes:

“Try to remember that the time before you publish is the only time you will ever work in complete freedom. After you’re published you will be forced to contend with the shockingly real voices of critics, agents, editors, and fans. You never get to be a virgin after the first time, and more to the point, you never again have the luxury of writing in total obscurity. But like the married person who bemoans the loss of freedom from her single days, the published author who longingly recalls her past obscurity is a little hard to sympathize with. Though you may suffer from loneliness after you’re married, it’s bad form to complain about it to your single friends.” (“The Ambivalent Writer”, p. 29).

“Some of the most gifted writers I’ve worked with were also the most self-sabotaging. Lack of discipline, desire for fame, and depression often thwart those whose talents appear most fertile, while those who struggle with every line persevere regardless.” (“The Natural”, p. 33).

“Whoever you are, whatever your bizarre behaviors, I say cultivate them; push the envelope. Becoming a writer never won anybody any popularity contests anyway. And most writers couldn’t win one if they tried.” (“The Neurotic”, p. 101).

“Like finding a tennis partner whose ability is a notch above your own, you will play better if your partner’s game challenges yours. All you really need during those long years when rejection may get the better of you is one friend with whom you can share your work, one fellow writer with whom you can have an honest exchange.” (“Rejection”, p. 169).

This is a book I know I need to read more than once–for enlightenment, wisdom, and encouragement. Not only does it help to give me a better understanding of myself as a writer (and my fellow writers), but even more it gives me insight on those creatures known as editors, publishers, and agents.