A Week at Hilton Head

Pod of Pelicans
horseshoe crab

Fish Haul Beach Park

Harbour Town Lighthouse
sand dollar
Pair of Pelicans
Side trip to Savannah

Beach read

Sunrise

Praise the Lord! Praise the Lord from the heavens; praise him in the heights!

Praise him, all his angels; praise him, all his hosts!

Praise him, sun and moon, praise him, all you shining stars!

Praise him, you highest heavens, and you waters above the heavens!

Let them praise Yahweh’s name because

it is he who commanded and they were created.

And he established them forever and ever;

he gave a decree, and it shall not pass away.

Praise Yahweh from the earth, you great sea creatures and all deeps,

fire and hail, snow and mist, stormy wind fulfilling his word!

Mountains and all hills, fruit trees and all cedars!

Beasts and all livestock, creeping things and flying birds!

Kings of the earth and all peoples, princes and all rulers of the earth!

Young men and maidens together, old men and children!

Let them praise the name of the Lord, for his name alone is exalted;

his majesty is above earth and heaven.

He has raised up a horn for his people, praise for all his saints;

for the people of Israel who are near to him. Praise the Lord!

Psalm 148

Kings Mountain National Military Park S.C.

I haven’t been blogging lately, but I have been writing. Still editing (trying to get that word count down that I worked so hard to build) and also working on a couple of short stories. Took a day to enjoy the spring sunshine during my son’s spring break and went to Kings Mountain. Besides being a nice place to take a not-too-strenuous hike (except for that little part when you’re going straight up the mountain but still piece of cake compared to its neighbor, Crowders Mountain), an important piece of American history took place there in 1780.

To sum: the Brits stirred up a hornets nest by threatening the Scots-Irish mountain men. The Patriots had lost several major battles, and Major Patrick Ferguson was sent to raise men for the loyalist cause in the Carolinas.  Sending a message to the leader of the “backwater men”, Ferguson riled the mountain men with his words that “he would march his army over the mountains, hang their leaders, and lay their country to waste with fire and sword,” if they did not desist from their opposition to British arms. With 900 of their best riflemen, the Patriots met Ferguson and his men on this mountain, and using their superior guerrilla tactics, defeated Ferguson and his men in little over an hour on October 7, 1780. This battle turned the tide of war in the Patriots’ favor which would eventually lead to their overall victory.

Memorial to the three African Americans who fought with the Patriots.

 

83 feet high, this monument was dedicated in 1909 with a list of those died in the battle.

The centennial monument dedicated on October 7, 1880.

In spite of his loss and death in this battle, Ferguson was honored for his service and is also known as the sharp-shooter who had an opportunity to shoot General George Washington, but out of a sense of honor did not.

A tree that seems to be flaunting its individuality. (I enjoy finding unusual trees).